Many colours from a single dot

Physicists Bart van Dam and Katerina Newell (Dohnalova) from the UvA Institute of Physics, in collaboration with Emanuele Marino and Peter Schall as well as colleagues from the University of Twente and Jiljin University in China, have shown that a single nanoparticle can be used to emit different colours of light. Their results, which were published in the nano- and microphysics journal Small, show that the particles under consideration may be a very efficient and versatile tool to produce light of all colours at tiny scales.

Researchers invent light-emitting nanoantennas

Scientists from ITMO University have developed effective nanoscale light sources based on halide perovskite. Such nanosources are based on subwavelength nanoparticles serving both as emitters and nanoantennas and allow enhancing light emission inherently without additional devices. Moreover, perovskite enables tuning of emission spectra throughout the visible range by varying the composition of the material. This makes the new nanoparticles a promising platform for creating compact optoelectronic devices such as optical chips, light-emitting diodes, or sensors. The results were published in Nano Letters.

Creating highly tunable adhesives with Kirigami-inspired structures

Tuning adhesion without relying on chemical treatment or micro or nanostructured surfaces is now closer with a novel, kirigami-inspired approach. New research shows that by carefully designing arrays of cuts in an adhesive film, the stickiness can not only be tuned by a factor of 100 across a single sheet, but also be decreased for an easy-release purpose. These kirigami-inspired structures at interfaces provide a mechanism to spatially control and enhance adhesion strength while providing directional characteristics for high-capacity, easy-release interfaces.

Researchers create first superatomic 2-D semiconductor

Atoms are the basic building blocks of all matter—at least, that is the conventional picture. In a new study, researchers have fabricated the first superatomic 2-D semiconductor, a material whose basic units aren’t atoms but superatoms—atomic clusters that exhibit some of the properties of one or more individual atoms. The researchers expect that the new material is just the first member of what will become a new family of 2-D semiconductors whose superatomic structures will greatly expand the diversity, functionality, and applications of 2-D materials.